The Halfway Decent Reset

The Rivervine YouTube channel is now an official thing. Here is the script for the launch video.

Have you heard of the Great Reset? It’s supposed to be an opportunity for the captains of industry to do one big mea culpa and change their evil ways. But instead of removing the planks from their own eyes, these unelected elitists are trying to influence public policy to dictate to us little people how to sweep the specks of sawdust out of our eyes.

I’m Gwen Alyce Clayton and I’d like to welcome you to Rivervine, a community on YouTube where we discuss things that are actually important. Tonight is the official launch of my channel and I can’t think of a more appropriate topic than rich people telling serfs to make sacrifices.

The concept for the Great Reset was spawned by the World Economic Forum, a not-for-profit foundation made up of, according to its website, quote, “political, business, cultural, and other leaders” with the goal of shaping “global, regional and industry agendas.” His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, aka Prince Charles, is one of the organization’s most outspoken members.

In a viral YouTube video, HRH said, “Unless we take the action necessary, and we build again in a greener, more sustainable and more intrusive way, then we will end up having more and more pandemics and more and more disasters from ever-accelerating global warming and climate change, so this is the one moment as you’ve all be saying, when we have to make as much progress as we can.”

Hey, I’m not afraid of looking in the mirror and telling myself I could do better. But I don’t need the beneficiary of centuries of colonialism lecturing me about evolving my economic model. That dude seriously needs to abdicate his own privilege before I take any of his advice on how to be a good steward of the earth. If he were to become a commoner and start going by the name Charles Mountbatten-Windsor, I might give him some brownie points.

What these guys need to do is rent a couple rooms from an Air B&B in Angola, Indiana and stay here for a few weeks. See firsthand how the farmers have to live and how difficult it would be to conform to the Green New Deal. How do rural children handle e-learning days when there’s ten inches of snow and no reliable internet? Or maybe they could rent an apartment in Southeast Fort Wayne and spend a month or two trying to pay bills on $7.25 an hour while raising a couple of kids with no nearby grocery store, shoddy public transportation, and a childcare center that closes at 6 p.m. Sharp.

It’s our lived experiences, not videos shown at conferences or roundtable discussions, that give us wisdom.

Let me make it perfectly clear: I am NOT a Marxist, and I think donkeys and elephants stink alike. The problem with both socialism and capitalism is they both fall victim to cronyism. If you think for one minute the leaders of a communist society are going to forego their luxuries like they ask of the proletariat, do some more research. Even binge-watching The Queen’s Gambit shows the opulent Russian hotel the chess tournament takes place in.

The only way to defeat cronyism is for ordinary people to make choices that direct consumer demand. We vote with our dollars. We discuss our ideals on social media. We read viewpoints that differ from our own. We listen to voices outside our sphere of influence. We learn by stretching the limits of our comfort zone. And this is where we set the agenda.

It’s on us as individuals to create a new American culture. Actually, it could be anywhere, really. Doesn’t have to be limited to the United States.

I call this utopia Rivervine. And the people of Old Town Rivervine are known as the Comatis.

Rivervine is the fictional northern California city that serves as the setting for my books, Fermata Cellars (2016), Zinfandel’s Grimoire (2020),and the upcoming Comatis Unveiled (TBD). It’s a place where small businesses flourish, all religions are respected, and individuals surf the waves of order in a sea of chaos.

Comati was the Dacian word for peasant. It’s the name I gave to the first generation of characters in my Rivervine Trilogy. They were farmers in 17th century Romania—the country formerly known as Dacia. As time passed, their descendants migrated to the New World and eventually became winemakers and spiritual leaders.

The utopia I write about in my fiction books is completely do-able in real life. It all starts like this:

You as an individual have a unique identity. It doesn’t matter what your race, religion, sex, gender, or social status is. That unique identity has inherent value and deserves respect.

But as individuals, we have families and live in communities that depend on each other to follow rules that prevent us from infringing on each other’s safety and wellbeing.

Each family, just like each community is unique, with its own needs, values, and abilities. Communities make up cities and towns. From there, we have counties, then states, and finally the nation and the world. All of these different units make up society. And for society to function properly, we have to respect each other as individuals, while realizing we are all connected.

The espoused Comati virtues include:

  1. Living a simple, modest lifestyle. Comatis are mindful consumers, choosing to patronize small, local businesses instead of large corporations whenever possible. Mom-and-pops give each community its unique identity and keep money circulating in the local economy. Large corporations send money out of the area, and franchises and big box stores turn us all into Anytown, USA. Why travel when every city has the same shops, restaurants, and hotels?
  2. Respecting nature, and striving to cause as little environmental damage as possible. Even though sacrificing natural resources is a reality in modern society, our goal is to be better stewards of the earth than we were the day before. Pick up litter. Try to keep the landfills from overflowing. Don’t drive somewhere if you don’t have to. Be mindful of the products you use in your home and the foods you put in your body.
  3. Voting politically independent. We believe each issue brought before a governing body should be weighed on the evidence presented, not a preconceived position established by a group of biased idealogues. Critical thinking should dominate the conversation. Logical fallacies are discouraged.
  4. Respecting spiritual agency as our most sacred human right. Although we celebrate the cross-quarters of the solar year as a group, all religions and faiths are welcome. Ceremony is a time to connect with each other in spirit while enjoying the ecstasy of ritual and pondering things not yet known to mortal humans.

If this is something you can get behind, then I encourage you be part of the Halfway Decent Reset and join the Rivervine community. Subscribe to this YouTube channel and hit the bell icon so you’ll be notified when videos are uploaded. If you would like to further your Comati studies, then be part of the Rivervine Patreon community.

For $3 a month, you can join at the Comati level where you will receive weekly messages every Tuesday with insights and commentary relative to esoterica and the spiritual relevance of the news of the day.

At the Protégé level, which is $9 a month, patrons will receive the weekly messages mentioned above as well as exclusive content to help you grow as a Comati.

For $25 a month, you can put me on retainer where I help you write content for your business or guide you in your individual esoteric pursuits.

I DO NOT want to hear anything about “you know, the Bible says not to dabble in the occult!” Yes, I know that. I was a Christian for 30 years, and we will definitely be discussing biblical issues on this channel, but I myself have explored other faiths over the last two decades and finally found a path I could believe in. I have made my peace with God and will accept whatever spiritual dings Saint Peter has in store for me at the pearly gates. You are welcome to follow me, but I will not be offended if this isn’t for you, and I ask you not to harass me or my friends about it.

In the meantime, I bid you peace. Have a happy and healthy 2021, and be sure to always Follow Your Path.

Published by Gwen Clayton

Gwen Clayton is a freelance writer living in northeast Indiana. She is the former editor of the Greater Fort Wayne Business Weekly, and has written for numerous other publications since 1986. Her first book, the paranormal thriller "Fermata Cellars," was published in 2016, and her Bible-inspired short story, "Purr: A story of love, lions and a Hebrew named Daniel," was released in 2019. She recently finished writing, "Zinfandel’s Grimoire," which is the sequel to 'Fermata;' that book is in the editing and design phase of publication. Her current works in progress include the third book in the Rivervine Trilogy, tentatively titled, "The Comatis," and the nonfiction, "Dragon's Poker Table: A rocker chick's breast cancer journey." Her books are independently published under the imprint, Rivervine LLC. In addition to writing books, Clayton contracts as a copywriter for local, small businesses. She lives in southwest Fort Wayne with her husband Eddie, a retired military veteran and avid photographer. When not working on their various projects, the couple enjoy traveling through middle America searching for adventure, patronizing mom-and-pop businesses, and promoting the general welfare of current and former service men and women. Gwen serves as the marketing chair and board member of the Northeast Indiana Base Community Council. She holds a bachelor of science degree in public administration from Regis University.

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